Fiber Fool

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Meet Masala…

Filed under: Knitting, Knitting Patterns, Designing, Color — Kristi at 3:33 am on Thursday, April 7, 2011

Masala Slippers

I know a designer having a favorite pattern is like a mom having a favorite child. I know one shouldn’t. Yet I can’t help myself. I’ve been sooo excited to release this pattern out into the world - Masala. There are a number of reasons why, most of which revolve around versatility. It too is part of the latest release of Nourishing Knits.

Masala Slippers

The colorwork pattern is super flexible. While I went with bold color choices for the samples, one could easily go much more subtle and they would still make an impact. Try a monochrome (two values of the same or similar hues) or analogous (two neighboring colors on the colorwheel) color schemes. No matter your color choices, I do not think you could go wrong. I’m personally itching to do a red and white pair. I think they’ll have a bit of a Scandinavian flare to them. I’m also kind of wanting to do a monochrome pair of taupe tones which I think would have a nice elegance to them.

Masala Slippers

I love that they fold flat so nicely. It makes them easy to slip into luggage when traveling without the bulk of many commercial slipper options. Plus, the stranded colorwork makes them nearly twice as thick as non-colorwork knitting fabric so there is plenty of warmth. At the same time, they fit into many popular clogs (I forgot to get any pics of that) if you need to duck out for the newspaper or put the trash out on the curb.

Masala Slippers

Masala are also very forgiving in fit. The two samples pictured are almost exactly the same size and they are on a Womens US 7 narrow foot (the blue and gold) and a US 8.5 medium (the plum and gold). They also both fit my US 9.5 medium foot. This ease of fit makes them great gift knitting! If you have the shoe size of your recipient the pattern includes detailed info on determining the total slipper length and a table of shoe size to average foot length to help you.

Also included is a picture diagram and some suggestions on customizing the vamp length - the portion of the slipper knit in the round before you begin toe shaping. The 2″ vamp version (blue and gold) is a bit more secure on the foot and creates a more casual and classic look. The 1″ vamp version (plum and gold) is a bit more trendy. You can choose your own preferred vamp length to suit your tastes and help is included on how to do so.

Sole of Masala Slippers

I need to take a minute to gush about the yarn though. Both samples were knit from Quince & Co’s Chickadee, their sport weight wool yarn. This yarn is fabulous! A new favorite. If you haven’t worked with it, I highly recommend ordering two skeins to knit these slippers. It is a super squishy yarn, making it possible to really crank down the gauge for maximum life on the slippers. It is plied well so there is no splitting while knitting. It holds up to multiple froggings without showing signs of wear.

The magic occurs after washing though - the stitches evened out so beautifully and the fabric developed a lovely hand, even with a very sturdy gauge. Plus, no bleeding whatsoever! Even with colors that are often troublemakers like the blue and plum. Another plus for those of us in the US is that is 100% US made too! I will definitely be working with more Quince & Co in the future.

masalacolorswatcheswtmk

These are just a few color combos from Quince & Co that I’m considering. The possibilities are endless. The more I think about it, I think a monochrome pair using Leek and Marsh would be lovely too. Someone stop me! I need to finish the rest of the book first! But I think there may be Masala slippers all around for the 2011 Holidays. Once you get the hang of it, they are a really quick knit and there is no finishing other than weaving in ends!

I do have a few surprises up my sleeve for those who have subscribed to Nourishing Knits before the final installment. So if you’ve been teetering on the edge, I’d suggest doing so soon to be included in the special goodies :-)

Nourishing Knits Special Subscription Rate of $16 - buy now

22 Comments »

Comment by Carole

April 7, 2011 @ 4:52 am

Those are beautiful and the pattern would be perfect for reenactment slippers!

Comment by CindyCindy

April 7, 2011 @ 5:59 am

You know how I feel about this pattern;-D

Comment by Beverly

April 7, 2011 @ 6:01 am

I can’t wait to knit these!!

Comment by StephCat

April 7, 2011 @ 7:22 am

Love these slippers!

Comment by Rebekah

April 7, 2011 @ 9:02 am

ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh you are making this so hard. I’m trying to not spend money on knitting things as I have so much, but those are amazing!

Comment by Deborah Robson

April 7, 2011 @ 9:11 am

These are classics you’ve invented. So lovely to see them in person, too.

Comment by Hillary

April 7, 2011 @ 10:54 am

Nice slippers. I really love the look of them.

Comment by Amanda

April 7, 2011 @ 11:28 am

Haa ha, Rebekah, you’re in luck. Don’t think of this as a knitting purchase. Think of it as a cooking purchase. You need these great recipes and it just so happens that you’ll be getting some knitting patterns too;-)

Comment by ana @ i made it so

April 7, 2011 @ 9:26 pm

i favourited this on rav just the other day! i love how different colour combos give them a totally different feel and look.

Comment by Rae

April 8, 2011 @ 12:22 am

Oh those are gorgeous & they look so comfortable.

Comment by Janet

April 8, 2011 @ 8:24 am

Kristi, these are just absolutely stunning! I would *SO* wear these as shoes.

Comment by mrspao

April 10, 2011 @ 5:33 am

They are so cute!

Pingback by Slipper sliding away « Quince & Co.

May 2, 2011 @ 8:13 am

[…] Kristi’s slipper design, Masala, is another installment in Nourishing Knits, her collection of knitted projects and recipes. Note the difference in the vamp—length from beginning to end of toe—in the pairs pictured. She includes instructions for both in her pattern. And great suggestions for other colorways. Oh–knitted in Chickadee… […]

Comment by lauren

May 2, 2011 @ 9:07 am

Oh I love these!!

Comment by Italian Dish Knits

May 2, 2011 @ 5:16 pm

LOVE these! I love Quince yarns, too. What a perfect pairing.

Comment by sacha

May 3, 2011 @ 8:38 pm

I like crocus and a yellow- reminds me of the grape hyacinth/daffodil combo in my yard:)

Comment by zenriver

May 4, 2011 @ 11:13 am

These are stunning ~ when will the pattern be available separately?

Comment by Whitney

May 24, 2011 @ 1:18 pm

I am in love with these! I would love a separate pattern, the book looks fantastic, but I have too much of a pattern queue backlog to justify the purchase of a whole book.

Comment by phyllis

May 25, 2011 @ 8:01 am

will you make this pattern available as a single?

Comment by Mariaeb

June 5, 2011 @ 1:58 pm

Love these slippers and Nourishing Knits was scheduled to be completed Spring of 2011. I would love the pattern for these slippers separately. Any clues when this might happen??

Comment by Isabel

September 1, 2011 @ 12:27 pm

Gorgeous slippers! Would love to buy this pattern as a single pattern!
Any idea of when it will be available for purchase as a single pattern?
Thanks!

Comment by Linda V.

February 2, 2012 @ 9:59 pm

Love this pattern and the yarn is yummy. I am using bird egg blue and leek.

I did discover one small error in pattern which threw me for a loop for a while. The chart legend is written so your purl rows would all be done in CC and that would not work for pattern…should be + ws purl with MC instead of CC.

Could not wait for KAL and started ahead and found things a little unclear at first, but once I figured out that legend was wrong and that you really need to use dpn’s to start it is going slowly but smoothly. I used 1 needle for each side and one for tab stitches. Worked great and did not stretch work.

Thank you for a lovely pattern!

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